The stupidest thing about this Oceangate thing

mktrat

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bonin in the boneyard

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Maybe once the investigation is completed.

I'm guessing it was the main cylinder that failed (the carbon fiber part). Or maybe the failure was where the cylinder met the metal dome or tailpiece.

If that's the case, was the failure primarily axial (like someone stomping on a soda can) or radial (like crushing a can from the sides)? Dunno.

Either way, the force of either the structure or seawater moving inward probably turned the victims to paste before they could register the sight or sound of the failure.
 

4strings

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My guess is a rupture where the metal was bonded to the carbon fiber. And you're right, the kind thing is that it was probably over in less than a second.
Differential coefficient of thermal expansion seems like it would be an issue working against that bond. I didn't look up the difference between titanium alloy & woven carbon fiber, but I bet there's a significant difference. That, and any compromise to the carbon weave is NG.
 

bonin in the boneyard

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Differential coefficient of thermal expansion seems like it would be an issue working against that bond. I didn't look up the difference between titanium alloy & woven carbon fiber, but I bet there's a significant difference. That, and any compromise to the carbon weave is NG.

Not just thermal, but in response to the compression. That tube was probably moving a whole lot relative to the endpieces on descent and ascent.
 

LBS-bass

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Maybe once the investigation is completed.

I'm guessing it was the main cylinder that failed (the carbon fiber part). Or maybe the failure was where the cylinder met the metal dome or tailpiece.

If that's the case, was the failure primarily axial (like someone stomping on a soda can) or radial (like crushing a can from the sides)? Dunno.

Either way, the force of either the structure or seawater moving inward probably turned the victims to paste before they could register the sight or sound of the failure.
They knew something was up, though. They had dropped their ballast in an attempt to start an ascent. I'm sure the actual end was quick, though.
 

Jim C

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One of you guys posted a video that said CF was great structurally in "shear" and the example was scuba tanks.
It went on to say that CF is lousy in compression like a submarine.
Also mentioned was limited research bonding TI and CF under pressure.
So let's take unproven, untested, and possibly very incorrect engineering and use it in a highly critical structure that offers zero chance of fail without lives lost.
 
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