Good new for DIY

Pilgrim

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Yesterday I changed the spark plugs on out 2016 Jeep Grand Cherokee. It has the 5.7L Hemi V8, and that particular engine runs two spark plugs per cylinder...so 16 plugs.

The good news is that they are extremely easy to reach! The heads are tilted a bit upward and there are almost no obstructions to accessing the coil packs and the plugs. You can see the socket in the passenger side front cylinder in each photo...and you can see how accessible the coils are.

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You can see that they're pretty easy to reach once you pop off the cosmetic engine cover. I used a magnetic spark plug socket with a 3" swivel extension attached - a very sweet little tool for this job.

The plugs have long threads, so a good part of the time was spent in just unscrewing old plugs and screwing in new ones. The car was at 127K miles, so it was a bit past time for plugs. The spec on plug gap is .035, and I had to re-gap most of the plugs which were set a bit too wide. All the plugs coming out had a gap of about .044, so they definitely showed wear. But the color was nice on all of them, and the Jeep doesn't use a bit of oil, so we're looking good now.

The torque spec on the plugs is only 13 lbs/ft, so I used a dab of anti-seize on each, and used a digital torque wrench that goes down under 10 lbs/ft to torque them. I thought about using my inch-pound wrench but it doesn't go quite high enough.

Two hours on a pleasant afternoon and that Jeep starts in an instant. It will do 24 MPG at 80 MPH on the highway, and we'll be cruising soon.
 

Jared

Royal Corn
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Yesterday I changed the spark plugs on out 2016 Jeep Grand Cherokee. It has the 5.7L Hemi V8, and that particular engine runs two spark plugs per cylinder...so 16 plugs.

The good news is that they are extremely easy to reach! The heads are tilted a bit upward and there are almost no obstructions to accessing the coil packs and the plugs. You can see the socket in the passenger side front cylinder in each photo...and you can see how accessible the coils are.

View attachment 12608


View attachment 12609



You can see that they're pretty easy to reach once you pop off the cosmetic engine cover. I used a magnetic spark plug socket with a 3" swivel extension attached - a very sweet little tool for this job.

The plugs have long threads, so a good part of the time was spent in just unscrewing old plugs and screwing in new ones. The car was at 127K miles, so it was a bit past time for plugs. The spec on plug gap is .035, and I had to re-gap most of the plugs which were set a bit too wide. All the plugs coming out had a gap of about .044, so they definitely showed wear. But the color was nice on all of them, and the Jeep doesn't use a bit of oil, so we're looking good now.

The torque spec on the plugs is only 13 lbs/ft, so I used a dab of anti-seize on each, and used a digital torque wrench that goes down under 10 lbs/ft to torque them. I thought about using my inch-pound wrench but it doesn't go quite high enough.

Two hours on a pleasant afternoon and that Jeep starts in an instant. It will do 24 MPG at 80 MPH on the highway, and we'll be cruising soon.
Doesn’t look like there would be room to use a speed bar on those. Too bad. Would have made removal and install way quicker. Maybe with a universal it would have worked.
 

Pilgrim

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I traded my 2019 Grand Cherokee, High Altitude Hemi, for my Silverado, because the GC was notorious for air bag failures on the suspension. I regret it though.
I was delighted to find this Jeep used and very clean without air suspension. I bought it at 88K miles (all interstate between here and Denver, 120 mile round trip) and I knew that I would be in for shocks before too long. I didn't need the air suspension and based on the anticipated cost of shock replacement, I didn't want it.

The mileage is due to the computer dropping the revs to about 1900 at 80 MPH in 8th gear. That V8 has the torque to drive the car at low revs. The ZF transmission seems well matched to it. I also like the paddle shifters on the GC...dropping into lower gears comes in real handy when descending long hills here in the Rocky mountains. Unfortunately most drivers don't understand that, because they never think about what gear they're in.
 
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4strings

Royal Corn
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Yesterday I changed the spark plugs on out 2016 Jeep Grand Cherokee. It has the 5.7L Hemi V8, and that particular engine runs two spark plugs per cylinder...so 16 plugs.

The good news is that they are extremely easy to reach! The heads are tilted a bit upward and there are almost no obstructions to accessing the coil packs and the plugs. You can see the socket in the passenger side front cylinder in each photo...and you can see how accessible the coils are.

View attachment 12608


View attachment 12609



You can see that they're pretty easy to reach once you pop off the cosmetic engine cover. I used a magnetic spark plug socket with a 3" swivel extension attached - a very sweet little tool for this job.

The plugs have long threads, so a good part of the time was spent in just unscrewing old plugs and screwing in new ones. The car was at 127K miles, so it was a bit past time for plugs. The spec on plug gap is .035, and I had to re-gap most of the plugs which were set a bit too wide. All the plugs coming out had a gap of about .044, so they definitely showed wear. But the color was nice on all of them, and the Jeep doesn't use a bit of oil, so we're looking good now.

The torque spec on the plugs is only 13 lbs/ft, so I used a dab of anti-seize on each, and used a digital torque wrench that goes down under 10 lbs/ft to torque them. I thought about using my inch-pound wrench but it doesn't go quite high enough.

Two hours on a pleasant afternoon and that Jeep starts in an instant. It will do 24 MPG at 80 MPH on the highway, and we'll be cruising soon.
It makes me happy when auto manufacturers make their cars easily serviceable.
 
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